12 Genius Tips On How To Travel Safe In Big Cities

Post Summary: 11 Tips On How To Travel Safe In Big Cities, gear recommendations, and best practices.

Have you ever had something stolen from you? It SUCKS.

Before we went to Paris, we heard tons of stories about sneaky pickpockets and tourists constantly getting scammed in the city.

Since Berty was photographing a wedding in the beautiful city of lights, we decided we needed to take extra safety precautions on this trip to France. We needed to learn how to travel safe in big cities because we had someone’s valuable wedding photos in our possession!!

For your next trip, here are some tips we have for traveling safely in big cities all over the world. Read on!

11 Tips On How To Travel Safe In Big Cities

1. Use Common Sense/Trust Your Gut

If someone or some situation feels sketchy, it probably is.

This long (but very thoughtful) article touches on why it’s important to listen to our inner subconscious. Your body and mind have ways of determining someone’s body language and genuine emotion.

A.k.a. you can spot someone attempting to tell you a fake story.

Keep this inner radar on especially while traveling. If your mind is trying to decide whether a choice is a good one or not, always stray on the side of caution.

2. Stay in Public Places

If you’re a first-time visitor, many people know the city better than you.

Don’t follow anyone down a dark street or into a closed-off area. Even if they seem friendly, never agree to follow someone to a private place alone.

Thieves will take advantage of your limited knowledge and already have an exit strategy ready to get away with your things. Don’t stray off into a street you aren’t familiar with!

3. Don’t Walk With Your Phone In Your Hand

I (Emily) am super guilty of this one in our neighborhood Seattle sidewalks. However, in places that are unfamiliar, it’s super important to be aware of your surroundings.

Put your phone away and look up from your screen for anyone suspicious.

My college neighborhood had a high property crime rate, and people got stopped on the street and their phones were taken constantly.

This is especially important while traveling. If your phone is the only internet source you have and it’s stolen, it will make your trip a lot more complicated.

4. Write Down Tech Serial Numbers

I recently had a police officer come to speak at my work about the importance of writing down all your tech’s serial numbers, and keeping them together in a safe place.

Pawn shops and similar are required to write down serial numbers of purchased products, so you are able to look up whether your gear was stolen and sold.

If in the horrible chance you are a victim of theft, here’s a website that rounds up resources for you to recover your stolen property!

5. Carry a Theft-Proof Bag To Travel Safe In Big Cities

Berty and I have two Pacsafe Bags. The kind that hides your zipper, and/or double hook it for extra protection.

On our recent trip to Paris, I was able to pack my sling bag with our subway passes, passports, and money, knowing that no one would steal our property!

If you don’t have a bag specifically designed to deter thieves, consider taking extra precautions like putting your zippers close to your body (so you can feel it when someone pulls on the tabs) or wear your bag at the front of your body.

Which brings me to tell you to…

6. Put your Backpack on The Front of Your Body in Transit

Property can easily be stolen on public transportation or busy city centers. People are constantly moving and your property could be on another train before you can even blink!

It’s wise to keep your items in the front of your body, with your arms over your bag.

If you must separate with your things (say like a train or small airplane) or you need to have it on your back, consider something like a backpack mesh cover that keeps pockets and zippers away from sticky hands.

7. Stay Alert + Do Your Research

In tourist-heavy areas, there are a lot of scammers who are really good at what they do.

Some use children as a way to make you pity them into giving money. Others can distract you from keeping track of your things. Even scarier are the kind of people who could spike a drink! Eek!

Research your destination before you go to understand the most common tactics in that area.

8. Hide Valuables (Or Leave Them At Home!)

You become more of a target for thieves if they see you with expensive items. Before you travel in big cities, switch out your designer purse for a less-flashy bag.

Take cheap sunglasses instead of your Ray-Bans. Consider leaving diamond earrings or other fancy jewelry at home.

If you must take items, say, camera equipment, computers, or an engagement ring (hellooo destination proposal!), hide them away in a deep and inconvenient pocket. Never stick your valuables in a front pocket or anywhere else easily accessible.

9. Don’t Share Your Whereabouts On Social Media (Or Simply Delay It)

This one is a little tricky for us, as we basically have our whole lives online. However, we do have a few tricks to staving off stalkers and prowlers when we’re traveling. Here are our tricks:

Delay your social media posts. Are you documenting your journey around a big city? Spend time snapping photos or recording video, but plan to share it the following day. Delaying your posts will allow you to share your travels in *almost* real-time, without the threat of people lurking hot on your trail.

Pass on live streaming video. Live streaming shares your location in real-time. To keep yourself safe from people who are actively looking at your whereabouts, skip the live stream until after your trip.

10. Dress Like a Local

In order to look as little like a tourist as possible, do some research before heading to your destination.

Learn about what locals wear, how conservative the country is, and what clothes can come across as offensive. Look to HerPackingList.com because it gives country/activity specific packing lists, and sometimes a little blurb about that specific country.

Dressing like a local will allow you to travel with more ease and fewer eyeballs on you!

Extra Safe Tips…

12. Locate Your Country’s Embassy

If your passport is stolen, or there is a country-wide emergency, embassies are a great resource. Here’s a link to every country and their US Embassy locations!

It’s always a good idea to have the closest one’s address written down in a small notebook in your possession. This is the best way to travel safe in big cities!

12. Purchase Property Insurance

If you are going to be traveling with expensive equipment, consider buying short-term travel insurance. Nomadic Matt has a great number of articles on this topic, check them out here!

What are some of your tips to travel safe in big cities? We’d love to hear anything you’d add to our list! Just leave us a comment below!

Thanks for reading!

Love,

MORE TRAVEL TIPS

6 Things To Do When Your Flight Is Delayed

11 Essential Long Haul Flight Tips

How To Avoid Overpacking

Genius Tips on How To Conquer Jet Lag

How To Save Money For Your Next Adventure

Do This Before You Leave For Vacation

A Weekend in Paris: Carry-On Packing List

6 thoughts on “12 Genius Tips On How To Travel Safe In Big Cities

  1. Great article! I’ve never been outside the US and I never considered some of these things, especially about locating the embassy just in case. Lots of resources and tips here, thank you!

    1. Thank you Paul! I’m glad you found tips like locating the embassy useful. I hope your first trip abroad is a safe and successful one!

  2. Thanks for sharing this informative article. Although these tips are based on our common sense but one must consider these tips while travelling alone. These are basic tips for a safe travel and if we want our journey to be safe and enjoyable we must follow the above things.

  3. Really great article!! I am traveling to London and would love to bring my DSLR for the photo ops, any bonus tips for cameras? Did you carry yours on your neck if you had it, or did you have a bag? Thanks!!

    1. Hi Ericka! I’m so glad you liked our article! That’s a great question about cameras. When they weren’t locked up in a backpack, we had a strap attached to them on our shoulders! As long as you know where your camera is at all times, you should be safe. 🙂

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